Running 2020

2020 was a challenging year for everyone. As if COVID-19 wasn’t enough, my mother died. So I’m really looking forward to 2021!

It’s hard to believe it’s already December.

It seems like it’s still March 50th, and now that it’s cold again it feels like summer never happened.

I start every year optimistically with the goal of running 1,000 miles. The closest I got was 977.82 miles in 2014.

In 2015 I “only” ran 562.91 miles. After running three marathons, three halfs, The Eastern States 20 miler and many 5Ks and 10Ks in 2014, I think I was a little burned out in 2015.

But each year since 2015 I have steadily built up my annual miles.

In 2019 I ran 929.6 miles and thought I was on track to hit 1,000 miles in 2020. Just a little more effort each month would get me there.

So far, for 2020, I’ve only reached 671.83 miles.

Running 2020 YTD

2020 got off to a good start with 69.51 miles and 86.08 miles in January and February respectively.

Those are the coldest months to run so I felt I was off to a good start.

Melrose Running Club at 2020 Super Sunday Race

 

 

 

 

This our running club at the last in person race I ran, The Super Sunday 5 Miler.

Ah the goo ole days. No masks and everyone was huddled up to keep warm.

At the beginning of March I was optimistic that improving weather would lead to increasing mileage. Then things went off the rails.

My mother went into the hospital just as the COVID-19 lock downs began. If she had been sick a week later none of us would have been able to visit her in the hospital.

So that really sucked but at least we could be there for her.

She recovered enough to be discharged to a rehab facility and we were into a new normal with her.

With the new rules on social distancing, our club had to cancel our Sunday Long Runs and Tuesday Night Club Runs. And I didn’t run a single race in March, everything was cancelled.

I still managed to run 83.58 miles. With all the shit I had going on, I’ll call that a solid month.

2020 YTD Running Miles, COVID Running

Spring Running 2020

In April, without any club runs, I was on my own.

To get my butt in gear I started doing short runs from my house several times a week. Running from my house was easy and there were no excuses not to do so a few times a week.

On April 19th I ran my first virtual race, The MRC Virtually Insane Half. The race was organized by the Melrose Running Club and a lot of us signed up.

It was my first attempt at a virtual race and I hadn’t figured out a good half marathon course yet. I ended up running 14.52 miles.

While I didn’t even run 60 miles in April, I felt like I was settling into the new normal. I managed 10 runs including the 14.52 mile half and a 10.7 mile long run.

In May I only ran eight times. Most runs were under five miles and one was 11.75 miles. I also ran my second virtual race, The Cinco de Mayo QuaranTeam 5K. With just eight runs I only managed 41.15 miles. 10 miles per week! Yikes!

This was about the time I started picking up my daughter after she got out of work around 8:30. I also started calling my mother every night after supper. With three siblings I had to pick my time to call and stick with it.

After my mother got out of the hospital and went to a long-term care facility we were hopeful that she could go back to assisted living, but that didn’t happen.

She became a long-term resident at what we colloquially refer to as a nursing home.

Between eating supper, waiting for my time slot to call my mother and then picking up my daughter, I didn’t have an hour to go run and get cleaned up most nights.

And with my mother’s turn I wasn’t exactly filled with enthusiasm for anything.

Summer Run Time

Great Bay Half Marathon 2020, Dunkin Donuts, Iced CoffeeIn June the weather began to improve, the days were getting longer and I was adjusting to my own “new normal”.

I ran eleven times including two virtual races. The Stepping Stones For Stella Virtual 10K and the Great Bay Half 2020 Virtual on June 27th.

Total miles for June were 61.83. Not great but 50% better than May. On top of that my second virtual half marathon came in at 13.12 miles.

I felt pretty good about my ability to run this distance accurately and was enthusiastic about running more halfs.

In July it began to get hot and sticky like it always does in Boston.

I was doing more yard work and this often lead to aches and pains that kept me from running the next day.

Old enough to know better, dumb enough to still over due it!

I only managed eight runs, but two of them were virtual half marathons. I was getting the hang of running from home on courses I made up as I went.

On July 3rd I ran the Jennifer Tinney 5 Mile virtual and the next week I ran the Margarita Virtual Half.

Margarita Half 2020, Kendall Square, running 2020This half was a really hot run into Kendal Square in Cambridge. I had never run this entire route before but I know the area fairly well.

Of course, things look different from the car. I had to stop at many intersections and go up about 30 steps to get over The McGrath Highway.

Margarita Half Marathon, virtual half, running 2020I had a pretty good idea of where I wanted to turn around which was near the Starbucks on Main Street. That’s at mile six on the map. I just had to stop in for an iced coffee.

I’ve never been so happy to have my cell phone and the Starbucks app locked and loaded.

Kendal Square was a ghost town even for a Saturday afternoon.

On July 17th I ran The Yankee Homecoming 10 Miler. This is a Gloucester race which is too far for me to get to after work, so I’ve never run it.

It’s not quite the same thing, but running virtual I was finally able to participate.

I managed a 9:13 pace and 434 ft of elevation climb. Going out I knew my selected course was hilly but I’ve run marathons with less elevation!

Then on July 21st we had our first Tuesday night club run! We had to check with the Public Health Departments in Melrose and each surrounding town for their particular rules.

We wanted to run together but be safe and respectful of the rules that each town established.

We also tried to avoid as much of the al fresco street-side dinning in Melrose as we could. Who wants a sweaty runner breathing on their calamari?

I only ran 3.22 miles that night, but it felt great to see some fellow club members.

Juneau Half Marathon 2020 Virtual, AlaskaOn July 25th I ran the Virtual Juneau Half Marathon. It was one of the Melrose Running Club’s Racing Series events. A few of us signed up for $20! And they sent us a shirt and a nice medal!

On some previous runs I discovered a rail trail that went from Everett through Malden to Saugus and ended in Lynn.

It took some effort to find the trail headed north from where I previously saw it in Malden, but I ended up finding it as I was looking for it.

A new course that I wasn’t sure about and I ended up running 14.01 miles. No biggie.

Something must have been going on with Garmin that day. Garmin had me gaining and loosing 141 feet in the first mile which began in front of my house. That first mile is pancake flat.

Every mile had me gain and loose 90 to 259 feet. No flippin way! Most of the run was on an old rail road bed. They don’t do hills.

I wish it were true, my total elevation gain for this run was 2,339 feet. Almost a half mile of elevation! That’s serious hill climbing!

I reality I probably gained 50 feet total and I was happy to find another nice course to run.

I ran another Tuesday night club run and the Cambridge Summer Classic 5K, Medford style to finish the month.

The Summer Classic was another home run on flat streets so I decided to push it and averaged 8:09 miles. I hadn’t run that pace since April.

That felt pretty good also. July totaled 57.46 miles.

Running 2020 Goals

With the year more than halfway over and pathetic miles in July, I began to see my 1,000 mile goal slipping away.

If you fall behind in January, you have eleven months to make up the short fall.

When you are more than 300 miles behind at the end of July, things begin to look stark. I’d have to run around 150 miles each month for the rest of the year, and I still hadn’t reached 100 miles in a single month.

So 1,000 miles wasn’t going to happen.

I know that 1,000 miles is a stretch goal and I’m not getting any younger. On top of that I had some unique family obligations requiring my prime running hours.

August was another tough month. I only ran 39.58 miles.

I managed nine runs, five of them under five miles.

On August 1st I started with a 2.86 mile run that I managed to squeeze in before super. I thought I was off to a good start but I didn’t run again until the next week!

But I got to two more Tuesday Night Club Runs and ran the Black Excellence Virtual 5K on August 22nd.

August was just a matter of time slipping away from me. I had things to do around the house, family obligations and working over time.

I’d sit down in the morning and look up in time for dinner. Some days I even forgot to have lunch!

September started out well with a Tuesday Night Club Run on September 1st. What a great way to start the month!

I got in a short home run and ran the TNCR the next week. These weren’t long runs but I was building some momentum.

Virtual Boston Marathon and a close call

Boston Marathon 2020, Water Stop OneOn September 12th I ran with our running club’s Virtual Boston Marathon team.

They had water stops and a nice flat course mapped out. It was great to run with a small group of people.

We all wore masks and tried to keep our distance. I ran 16.05 miles which was a few more than I should have. It was still fun!

The next day one of our runners told us that their spouse had tested positive for COVID! She went for a test and it came back negative.

My company was trying one day a week in the office, which we thought was one step towards normal.

The day I went into the office I got a message that my friend’s test had been mis-read and she was actually positive!

I sent a text to my manager and before I could stand up he had opened his office door and was pointing towards the door.

I collected my things and was out of there in minutes. That was the last time I’ve been into the office.

I went to a drive in test site that my healthcare provider had in Boston. It was on the top floor of their parking garage.

They checked me in and told me where to park. And within five minutes I was getting a deep brain probe just like you see on TV.

The Governor described it like they were tickling the bottom of his foot. And the look on his face as he said that made me a little squeamish as the nurse un-sheathed the swab to stick up my nose.

It ended up not being that bad and kind of made me feel like I needed to sneeze. And sneezing is the last thing you want to do at a COVID test site!

That was Friday and Saturday afternoon the owner of my company called to see how I was doing and if I had my results yet.

I told her I wouldn’t get them until Monday. She didn’t say it but she needed to know my results before she could decide what to do about Monday.

I felt bad that it would take so long but this was when the testing companies were getting buried. There wasn’t a thing I could do to speed things up.

From the tone of her voice I could tell she was genuinely concerned. But the call was as much about business as it was about me.

She told me about an urgent care office in Cambridge that did the rapid test with results in an hour.

Sunday morning I went and got the rapid test and thankfully it came back negative.

It made me think how much one person can effect other people’s lives.

A few more September Races

Wicked Half 2020, running 2020In September I also ran the Rett’s Roost 10K, Cambridge Fall Classic 5K and The Wicked Half Marathon.

The Wicked Half was pretty hilly, 488 feet elevation gain.

I ran the Fellsway Hills into Melrose and wrapped around Spot Pond.

This was a new half marathon course for me and after I turned around I realized I was too close to home to get in a full half.

So I started literally going up side streets to add some distance.

Some of the side roads off of the Fellsway have some wicked hills. I think I found them all.

This run kind of knocked the snot out of me and I averaged 9:47 per mile. While a lot of the course is relatively flat, where there was hill, there was hill!

I bought the mask I’m wearing in this photo at a running shop. It turned out to be the worse mask type I’ve run with.

I finished off the month with a 4 mile home run on the 29th.

For September I ran 13 runs for 67.50 miles. This wasn’t going to get me to 1,000 miles but it was better than August.

Oh October

October was a month that changed my life forever.

On the first I got a call from my sister in Maine.

My mother had been experiencing declining health all summer but seemed to rally now and then.

The nursing home had called to say that she was declining quickly and they had started palliative care.

We were lucky in that they never asked what state I lived in. Maine was in lock down like the rest of the country. Nursing homes had even tighter requirements. If they knew that I was from out of state, I’m not sure they would have let me in.

They had us wear gowns and protective eye wear even though I have glasses.

The first day my brother and I spent the whole day with mom. She got out of bed for a while and spoke with us.

She didn’t eat a thing but she drank two cups of ice water. We had hoped that she would eat something but everyone was thrilled that she drank anything.

She grew tired after about an hour and the nurses got her back into bed. She talked a little more but was exhausted and went back to sleep.

The next day my younger sister arrived from Germany. She was lucky in that her region of Germany was a green zone at the time.

Mom never regained consciousness but the four of us were with her every day. We took shifts visiting and when all four of us were there, two had to sit out side of her window.

The window opened and we could talk, but no one could reach in and hold her hand.

Being a resourceful group, we realized that we could remove the screen! My sister was able to hold mom’s hand for a while which I’m sure made both of them happy.

The next day we got a call from the nursing home around 5AM that she was fading quickly.

We all quickly dressed and headed to the nursing home.

I’m not sure how they did it but they let all of us in to see her and moved her bed into their library.

We spent the whole day with her until she passed at 8:16 PM on October 7th.

All of those calls each night after dinner were worth it. At times I worried she thought I was calling every day because I was afraid that she’d die in the night.

We were so grateful to everyone at the nursing home. They went out of their way to accommodate us and give us time with our mother.

So many people die alone in ICU or in a nursing home because no one can come in to see them. That just has to suck for everyone.

On October 9th I went for a 4.76 mile run on the roads near my sister’s house. I’ve run there before and I really needed a run.

Nothing clears your head like a good run.

The next day I went out again for a 7.77 mile run.

The next weekend I ran Saturday and Sunday. 8.41 and 3.77 respectively.

I did my Tuesday night run from home as I wasn’t in the mood to be social.

I did another home run Wednesday night and that Friday I ran the Smuttynose Rockfest Half from home.

This was another run through The Fells and around Spot Pond. Instead of running up all of those steep side streets to get to 13.1 miles, I took some side streets in Medford.

My total elevation gain was 583 feet but I avoided steep hills so it seemed easier. My pace was 9:32 and my time was 2:05. With more hills than The Wicked Half I managed to cut three minutes off of my time.

A rounded the month off with another Tuesday Night Club Run and ran 48.95 miles for October.

Running November

I started November by running The Melrose Y’s Spooky Sprint. This is a Halloween run, but I didn’t get to it until Sunday the first.

That’s one of the problems with virtual races.

Since you don’t have to drive anywhere or make any plans it’s easy to forget about them.

Once I got a package in the mail and realized I had a 5K to run that weekend!

Some races were live events earlier in the year, were postponed and eventually went virtual.

Many races allowed you to run a race on a weekend, or gave you a week or month to run the race!

One race that I was sure I had registered for, I couldn’t find any of the usual email traffic for a registration.

It got confusing at times.

On the 5th I did a four mile home run and then on the 6th I ran the DAV 5K from home.

I had figured out some good half marathon courses and ran the 100% Pure Kona Coffee Half on November 8th, the Rock n Roll Half on November 14th and The Livestrong at The Y Half on November November 21st.

I ran the Livestrong Half during the Melrose Running Club’s No Contact Relay.

We started at sunrise and ran until sunset.

Andy Nagelin at Straw Point on 3rd lapI ran three 4.76 mile laps for a total of 14.28 miles. When I got to the 13.1 mark my watch said 2:00:23. With more than 450 feet of elevation gain I finally got my half to the two-hour mark.

Unfortunately during the last two miles of that run my ankle started bothering me. Nothing new. Things often start or stop hurting during a run.

That afternoon I could barely walk up or down steps and the next day was worse.

It’s been over three weeks and I haven’t run since. My ankle is getting better but I may not run at all in December.

I don’t want to run on it too soon and aggravate my Achilles again and prolong the healing time. It’s taking long enough as it is!

Essentially my running year is over. If I’m careful and lucky I might run a neighborhood 5K before the end of the year, but I’m not counting on it.

Here’s looking to a brighter future!

Andy

Body Helix Compression Wraps Review

I received a complimentary Body Helix Compression Full Knee sleeve in exchange for writing this review.

Body Helix makes a full line of compression products for just about any part of the body that may experience inflammation from a sports injury or arthritis.

Applying compression for shoulder or piriformis pain can be a challenge. Body Helix has compression wraps for these areas plus thigh, calf, bicep, ankle and lower back.

As a runner, I frequently deal with inflammation in my knees. Often this inflammation is experienced as the pain most runners are familiar with.

Over my seventeen years of running, I’ve been in physical therapy several times. In addition to stretching and strengthening exercises, my PT always recommends R.I.C.E.

I’ve read many articles on sports injury and they usually recommend R.I.C.E also.

So what is R.I.C.E. ? It stands for: Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation.

Body Helix explains how compression aids in recovery as part of R.I.C.E.

Rest, ice and elevation are fairly easy to do, but applying compression can be a challenge.

In the past I’ve used an ace bandage. But it’s easy to wrap them too tightly, and they are intended to immobilize a joint. If wrapped too thickly, ice may not be able to penetrate through to your joint.

A compression sleeve is a better option and I own another brand sleeve. It works pretty well but I can’t wear it under pants and I never run in it. It’s a good solution when I’m hanging around the house and don’t plan to do much. It does work well with ice.

When I had the opportunity to try a Body Helix full knee compression wrap, I checked them out on line and agreed to give it a try.

About Body Helix Compression

Body Helix was founded in 2008 by world-ranked senior tennis player Fred Robinson and physician, Thomas E. Parker, MD.

At the time, Fred observed that most compression gear was uncomfortable, ineffective and did not use the latest materials available.

Fred and Dr. Parker searched for a material that would stretch, rebound and stay in place. And most importantly, provide effective compression.

They developed a product that provides a uniform medical-grade compression in the range of 20-30 millimeters of mercury (or mmHg in the scientific community.) The higher the number, the more pressure we feel.

Twenty to 30 mmHg is the first range of medical grade compression and has scientific evidence documenting increased blood flow and the benefits of compression.

Body Helix has four main differentiating factors that set them apart from the competition:

FORM-FIT TECHNOLOGY

A Helix consists of comfortable, uniform medical-grade compression in the range of 20-30 millimeters of mercury (or mmHg in the scientific community.) As mentioned above, the higher the number, the more pressure we feel.

Twenty to 30 mmHg is the first range of medical grade compression.

Below I’ll discuss how the Body Helix wrap feels.

MOISTURE ACTIVATED ADHERENCE

You’ve seen the person at the gym or on the court stop to pull up their knee sleeve or adjust their thigh wrap. That won’t happen with a Helix.

Thanks to their fabric’s Moisture Activated Adherence, their sleeves utilize the heat/sweat from your body and allow the fabric to act like an adherent between your skin and the product. It won’t slip or move during activities.

The wrap didn’t slip during my 10K run.

CLOSED-CELL FABRIC SCIENCE

Other wraps soak up sweat and take forever to dry, which often leads to unpleasant odors from bacteria becoming trapped within the fabric.

Because a Helix features Closed-Cell Fabric Science technology, it won’t hold sweat or water and you’ll never have to worry about odors or health issues from trapped bacteria.

The wrap is easy to rinse and the smooth fabric makes it easy to wear under clothing.

INFINITE MOTION

Many other products will only stretch up to 50%, which often restricts joint movement while being active. Body Helix compression sleeves (created by professional athletes, by the way, so they literally feel your pain) is made of the highest quality compression material available and will stretch more than the human body.

What this means for you is simple: you won’t need to alter your mechanics of motion when you serve, swing, bend, or run. You can continue to play your game, your way, without limits.

The sleeve was easy to run in and allowed me to bend my knee comfortably while driving.

Body Helix Compression Review

I tested the Body Helix full knee compression sleeve under daily conditions and during a 5 mile race and 10K training run.

Body Helix full knee compression sleeve, product reviewThe Body Helix compression sleeve has a smooth surface and the material does allow for a full range of motion.

l was able to wear it comfortably under a pair of jeans, drive my car and run errands.

This isn’t the greatest photo, but you can barely tell which knee has the sleeve on.

The comfort of the sleeve makes it possible to go about your day and not be stuck laying on the couch.

Road Race Testing

At the Super Sunday 5 mile race I tested the Body Helix compression sleeve. I’ve never worn anything on my knees before and wondered what it would be like.

Body Helix Compression Sleeve, Super Sunday 2020My knees are not bothering me, but I knew this would be a great test.

It was February 2nd, so I had to wear tights. I think this is a real world situation that most runners can relate to.

The sleeve easily slipped over the tights material and was firmly in place.

As you can see, it blends in well with the tights and no one even noticed.

I ran the five-mile race in 41 minutes which is about my regular pace.

During the race I forgot I even had it on. It didn’t bind or pinch and I never felt like it was slipping off. This allowed me to focus on the race and enjoy my self. What more could you ask for?

When I got home I rinsed it in the sink and it looked and smelled like brand new the next day.

Comparison Run

For my next outside run I wore the Body Helix compression sleeve and a sleeve I already own.

I’ve never worn anything on my knees while running except for the Super Sunday race. This time I didn’t wear tights.

As I headed out I wondered if both sleeves would end up causing problems. The last thing I wanted to do was mess up a nice run by stopping to pull up a compression sleeve.

On bare skin, both sleeves were more noticeable. The other brand sleeve was rougher on my skin and covered more of my leg. The Body Helix sleeve was smooth and clung to my skin like a bandage.

About three miles into my run the other sleeve felt like it was slipping off of my thigh. When I reached down I found that it had barely moved, so I left it alone and never broke stride.

Neither sleeve felt like it was hindering my run. They both felt pretty comfortable and for most of my run I didn’t really notice them.

When I finished my run I took this photo. I’m not a professional, but this is what they looked like shortly after finishing my 10K run.

The top of the other sleeve had slipped a bit as you can see.

If I was running a half or full marathon, the other sleeve could have become an issue.

I’m not sure that I’d run a marathon if I felt that I needed to use a compression sleeve.

In my opinion, compression sleeves should be used as part of the R.I.C.E. recovery protocol. And if you are dealing with knee pain you should stick to shorter runs anyway.

A look at other Body Helix compression sleeves

I have shoulder pain currently and have experienced piriformis issues in the past. One of these items would have been great to have.

The web site does say that the shoulder sleeve may not work for everyone and they suggest using it after surgery and not for general pain relief and recovery. I’d give it a try any way.

The compression on my knee felt good and it’s near impossible to apply compression to a shoulder.

I’m not sure that there is a good way to apply pressure to the piriformis or a groin pull.

Check out the Body Helix web site for all of their products. You will probably find a compression sleeve to meet your recovery needs.

You can use promo code BH10RUN to get 10% off any item.

If you try one of their products let me know how it worked for you.

Run well my Friends,

Andy

First Run

First run in twenty-four days!

My physical therapist gave me the green light to start running again at my appointment on Tuesday. I could have gone out Tuesday night but on the way home I noticed lots of patches of ice. I’ve waited this long, why risk slipping on the ice and aggravating my knee?

The Test Run

This first run was a test run, so I decided to use the treadmill so that I could control my speed accurately. If I felt anything I could stop right away and not have to walk back on a sore knee.

The run wasn’t anything impressive, but I managed to run for 15 minutes at 6.5mph without any pain! I was a little nervous the entire run. I felt a twinge while using the elliptical Monday. I was concerned that I would get another one while running.

When I got to 15 minutes I had a great sense of relief. I had passed the first test. Tomorrow I’ll run for 20 minutes at the same speed and see how that feels. Over the weekend I’ll take it easy and next week I’ll start doing 30 minute runs. By the end of next week I’ll try a 4 mile run.

Half at the Hamptons

The Half at The Hamptons is ten days away. That race will be my distance first run test. Can I run for two hours or more and not feel any pain? What if I do feel pain? Race conditions are very different from 30 minutes on a treadmill.

I plan to start this race slow, and stay that way. There is no pride involved in this race this year. This race is another test and another step in my recovery. The race isn’t to test my speed or fitness. It’s to test my body’s ability to just run. Simple as that.

loco running, Half marathon, Hampton Beach, first run
Half at the Hamptons -2014

Run well my friends!

Andy

© 2014 anagelin

Recovery and Pontifications

My journey as an injured runner continues

Except for the BAA 10K last Sunday I have not run at all this week. Every time I drive somewhere and see runners, the urge to jump out of the car and run with them is overwhelming. I feel like my entire routine is out of whack and off-balance.

roller, recoveryI’ve been using my new Thera-Roll foam roller every night and sometimes in the morning. Now my other hamstring is a little sore from the rolling! The muscles are not used to getting this type of pressure so it is uncomfortable while rolling and is then uncomfortable afterwards. I think it is working, but this is going to be a long-term recovery.

I went to the running club on Tuesday night but did not run. It was the final night for our Walk to Run program and I wanted to be there as everyone finished their first 3 mile run. It was fun to see them finish. Just about everyone I spoke with intends to keep running with the club. Afterwards Marathon Sports had some food and gift bags for all of the Walk to Run participants.

While I was there I talked to some of our veteran runners about my injury. Everyone agreed that it can take a long time to recover and you can’t rush it. I was also cautioned not to hit it hard when I come back as I can risk a re-injury. Rest, ice, ibuprofen and the roller were all recommended and getting some PT was suggested. It was also apparent that almost every runner gets an injury at some point in their career. It just comes with the territory.

Being patient is the most difficult part of recovery. I had plans to run a lot of 5K and 10K races this summer as part of my training for my fall marathon. I’m glad I didn’t sign up and pay for those races now. Registration fees are normally nor-refundable. With each passing week the marathon gets closer and just thinking of the date makes me nervous. I’m going to start doing some short easy runs in the next week. If I feel any pain I’ll stop and take some more time off. If everything feels okay I’ll continue with short easy runs, just to be doing something.

This week’s pontification:

There is an adage that goes something like this:

“You’re never more likely to make a mistake than when you are absolutely sure that you are right.“

The logic is that when you are 100% confident in your choice, conclusion or way of thinking you stop looking for alternatives and disregard any facts or ideas that contradict your choice, conclusion, or idea.

In spite of better information you hold firmly to your beliefs even if the alternative is indisputably the better choice and disaster is imminent.

My running equivalent is this:

“You’re never more likely to injure yourself than when you are feeling strong, healthy and confident.”

When you have all of this going for you it is easy to feel that you can tackle any run at any pace. It makes it easy to disregard fatigue and disregard the fact that you are pushing yourself beyond your normal limits.

You can injure yourself in an instant and sometimes not even realize it.You may not feel an injury until the next day or your next run. While as humans and runners we need to push ourselves in order to make progress, we should not disregard common sense and safety. When we are at our peak or maximum we also need to realize that we cannot push much harder without risk of injury.

We all have limits. Go out and find those limits, but be careful about pushing too far beyond those limits.

Recovery can take a long time and is frustrating. Some injuries never go away completely, so it is best to try and avoid injury when you can.

Run well my friends.

©2012 anagelin

Pain and Recovery

Yesterday was a bad day for me. I got in a 10K run before work but ended up exacerbating the problems with my right hamstring. All day I had to get up and walk around to stretch it and felt like an old man each time. On the drive home my leg and hip were killing me and I couldn’t wait to get out of the car.

Pain and recovery

pain and recoveryLast night I went and did something I’ve been thinking about for a long time: I bought a foam roller. People have been telling me how wonderful they are. I have finally gotten to the point where I have to try something different. The Coleman freezer pack under my leg while watching TV at night just isn’t getting it done.

I went over to Marathon Sports in Melrose and looked at the rollers they have. They are not cheap! I kept thinking these are extruded in some third-world country and cost a dollar to make. The guy at the store had me try a few out and answered my questions, all the reasons we go to running stores! The one I ended up buying cost $64.95!

After trying a few different rollers and asking lots of questions, I decided to go with the firmest one with the ridges, the Thera-Roll. I need to dig deep into that hamstring!

To save a few bucks, well a lot of bucks, I went with the 18 inch 6lb Thera-Roll. As I walked out of the store and then drove home, my hamstring seemed to feel better all ready. “Is that possible” I thought? I only rolled for a few minutes and have no idea how I’m supposed to do this.

I used it some more when I got home. As a multi-tasker I was psyched that I could roll and watch Charlie Rose at the same time! Fantastic! Those ridges dug in good and deep and I could feel something going on.I only rolled for about 5 minutes and I have no idea if that was too long or to brief. I need to do some research today.

I’ll let you know what I find from my research and if this thing actually works.

  • Have you used one of rollers before?
  • Did it work for you?
  • How long did it take to feel results?

Run well my friends!

©2012 anagelin