BAA Half Marathon in 19 days

As of today I have 19 days until the BAA Half Marathon

It makes me both a little excited and a little nervous.

Anyone who has indulged me and read this blog for any amount of time knows I’ve been working through a hamstring or piriformis injury since early this summer. The physical therapists at Harvard Vanguard in Somerville have been doing a great job and I feel like I’m on the road to recovery.

After running the Lake Winnie Relay and the Lone Gull 10K this past weekend, my confidence has returned. I’m still in pain sometimes but it takes longer to hurt and the pain is less intense. Even with “competitive” running these past few weekends my leg continues to improve. I know that I’m not out of the woods with this yet, but I feel that I can salvage the rest of my running season.

The Lone Gull 10K turned out to be an amazing run for me. I didn’t spend a lot of time planning or specifically training for it, but everything worked. I’m going to follow the same routine for the BAA Half. No high fiber food but high glycemic food instead, like Fig Newtons. I want to have my blood sugar nice and high during the race. During the 10K I took a GU around 2.6 miles, less than half way. I’ll probably take 2 or 3 GUs with me on the Half and take one every 3 miles or so. The GU is designed to boost blood sugar to give that boost of energy.

I’ve learned to stop drinking about 30 minutes before start time. I get in line for the porta-potty and do not start drinking again until a few minutes before the start. This way I get all of the “processed” fluid out of my body before the race. The water I drink in the gate will be in my system to do what it’s supposed to do and will be eliminated as sweat.

Usually the BAA has paper cups for their water stops. I’ve learned to pinch the top of the cup, keep running and take a gulp. I often only get one mouth full, but it is usually enough if I hit all of the water stops. I’ve come to call this “The Runners Gulp”. Pinching the cup helps keep me from pouring water in my shoes as I run also.

So, 19 days to stretch and get a few “long” runs in. 19 days to avoid over doing it or getting injured. When the club runs on Tuesday nights it is now pitch black out. This can be very dangerous and last week one of my friends took a spill during our run. I’ve done it, just about everyone has. Usually it’s no big deal. But, a twisted ankle or worse can ruin a race if you do not have a few weeks to recover. so, it’s almost time to step cautiously and be a bit more careful.

Thanks for stopping by, and have a great run!

©2012 andrew nagelin

Notice to all 2012 Boston Marathon participants

The BAA posted this advisory to their website earlier today. I still plan on running the race but I will not be going for a PR. I think that saying that I survived and finished will be good enough. We may end up running the hottest Boston Marathon on record. Be safe.

Boston Marathon Advisory

We are looking closely at the current weather situation which is projected  to be quite warm. The B.A.A. is closely monitoring this situation for race day decisions. If the temperatures reach certain levels, running will put even the most fit athletes at risk for heat injury. We are now making the recommendation that if you are not highly fit or if you have any underlying medical conditions (for example-cardiac disease, pulmonary disease or any of a number of medical problems), you should NOT run this race.

  • Inexperienced marathoners should not run.
  • Those who have only trained in a cooler climate and who may not be acclimated (for at least the last 10 days) to warm weather running conditions should also consider not running.

For those very fit athletes who decide to run, you should take significant precautions:

  • Run at a slower pace and maintain hydration.
  • You should frequently take breaks by walking instead of running.
  • This will not be a day to run a personal best.  If you choose to run, run safely above all else. Speed can kill.
  • Heat stroke is a serious issue and is related to intensity of running as well as the heat and humidity.

Good hydration is important but over hydration can also be a problem. Thirst is an indication that you are under-hydrated. You should maintain hydration levels slightly greater than your hydration program in your training, but not excessively so.

Even the fittest athletes, that take precautions can still suffer serious heat illness. Recognizing symptoms of heat illness in yourself and others is critical , this may include headaches, dizziness, confusion, fatigue, nausea and vomiting. If you experience any of these, stop running immediately and if symptoms persist seek medical attention.

Boston Marathon Co-Medical Directors, Dr. Pierre d’Hemecourt and Dr. Sophia Dyer

Go to www.baa.org GOOD LUCK PARTICIPANTS! Sincerely, B.A.A.

Run well my friends,

Andy